Game Day

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This topic contains 1 reply, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Lee Dunne 1 year, 6 months ago.

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  • #722

    admin
    Keymaster

    Game Day Preparation
    Before the first game, coaches must make sure all passes have the correct player and coaches pictures on them and have them ready to give to the referee. Also, if you are the home team you are required to provide the game card. The away team fills in their team information at the game (or ideally has created a roster label). Game Cards are in the packets handed out to coaches in advance of the season.

    Game Day Responsibilities
    Reminder: Home Team is responsible for Game Ball and Game Card

  • #55211

    Lee Dunne
    Keymaster

    Dealing with the parents on your team.
    Although it is not only for game day, a lot of what you do in preparation for those days, can help you create a very positive and rewarding experience for your players. And for you!

    Here in the City the traditional team is different to that of a typical club. At the recreational level, schools tend to put teams together with a parent who is willing to coach and off they go on their experience into the Soccer world of SF. At prep and certainly at comp, it is more of a tryout process and acceptance onto a team. In all honesty, regardless of the situation, parental expectations need to be set.

    Setting the meeting.
    Personally, although it is easier to schedule a meeting at the first practice, I believe you should do it away from the field and before the first practice. Why? Because it keeps the field for Soccer and sets a standard before you get going on the field. Meet at a pizza place or somewhere similar.

    Present an outline for the meeting.
    No ‘and another thing’ or forgetting what you wanted to say. Hindsight is a bugger! If you need an example agenda, email info@sfyouthsoccer.com, we will be happy to share with you. Email it to the parents before as it will give them time to, hopefully, take a look and come up with any questions.

    Share your philosophy and wishes for the team.
    If they know this prior to the season, they will know what to expect, how it pertains to their child, and ultimately how they behave.

    If you declare that you are going to go 8-0 in the season, then the parents will expect that. If that doesn’t happen then you are in for trouble with those expectant parents who have bought into your team.
    On the other side of the coin, if you declare its all about fun and high 5’s, with the 05 Boys, then you could also expect push back as this is a key competitive age in boys.
    – Do you know the parents already? Maybe it is the same team and the expectation to just keep providing playing opportunities for them is all they want.

    Who are you, you the coach.
    One of our biggest feedback topics is the quality of the team coach. You can, again, set the standard and the expectations. If parents are expecting a professional coach with an ‘A’ license, but you are a volunteer mum/dad who is doing this to coach your kid, then the parents need to know that.

    Are you open to help? Do you need some kind of professional support, either from SFYS or from another coach or parent. If so, voice that need early on – you could be surprised at the support you could get from your team, but there is certainly support available from SFYS.

    If you have a playing style that you want to implement, then outline it, and outline the WHY. Help the parents understand. Quick passes from every situation gives the players the ball at their feet and you believe that is integral for their development and their confidence in having the ball at their feet.

    Asking for feedback.
    Asking for the parental feedback and agreement is key to having them support their player through the season. If you are determined that your team will take every throw-in, goal kick, corner kick, and free kick quickly and to the team mates feet (even when there is a shot on goal to be made and you are losing 1-0 with 1 minute left) then your parents need to know and agree to that. So that when you get into those situations they are not screaming for shots at goal or big long goal kicks when you have conceded 3 goals already from misplaced passes.

    Expectations for practice and game day.
    When do you want players there? For practice and games? Is attendance expected at practice?
    What are the expectations on the parents? Sit on the side of the field and coach? Walk up and down the sideline and follow their player and their every move? Or to ‘love to watch you play’?
    Cheer when the other team score????

    Provide feedback.
    Weekly. Wrap up the previous game, practice from this week, and set the expectations for the upcoming game. ‘We are building on the game from last weekend in which we did xxx really well. In practice we have done more of xxx to help us get the ball forward quicker etc. etc. etc.’

    Set the standards and set the expectations that you will follow and that you expect players / parents to follow also to set up for a positive season, guaranteed!

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 6 months ago by  Lee Dunne.

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