Global Game, Team Management

Photographing the game.

SFYS loves your pictures. REALLY loves your pictures.
So much so that we want to help you get a better pictures all of the time.
We spoke with SF local Richard Osborn, a longtime photojournalist/content producer whose work has appeared in such outlets as Inside Tennis, Diablo Magazine, Men’s Journal, USOpen.org and BNPParibasOpen.com, to gather tips that can help you grab the action like never before.
Thank you, Richard!

10 TIPS FOR PHOTOGRAPHING SOCCER

1. GET CLOSE TO THE ACTION
When possible (and without distracting the teams or telling the players what to do), shoot from the sidelines/endlines. Closer isn’t always better, but more often than not it is.

2. THERE’S NO SUBSTITUTE FOR A GOOD PIECE OF GLASS
There’s no getting around it: zoom lenses are expensive. But a good lens — especially a fast one such as a 2.8 — can make all the difference between run-of- the-mill and great sports photography. Craigslist/eBay have deals on used gear, or check www.borrowlenses.com.

3. THE NEED FOR SPEED
If there is ample light, try to shoot action at 1/1000 of a second or faster. This way you get a nice, crisp capture with the action frozen. To do so, you may need to open up your aperture to f/4, f.2.8 or f/1.4, depending on your lens’ capabilities.

4. PHOTOSHOP IS INVALUABLE
From sharpening images to increasing color saturation to cropping, Photoshop can be a photographer’s best friend.

5. IT HELPS TO BE A GOOD EDITOR
No one wants to pour through 200 photos of a soccer game. Narrow your work down to your very best results.

6. ANTICIPATION IS EVERYTHING
Understanding the game can help you as a photographer, too. The more you know soccer, and understand its ebb and flow, the more you know when and where to position yourself.

7. THE CAMERA IS ONLY SO SMART
While it’s convenient to shoot in AUTO mode, your camera’s light meter is only so infallible. The MANUAL mode is often a smarter option.

8. LEARN TO READ THE LIGHT
While shooting into the sun is anything but impossible, it can be tricky. It’s often easier to shoot with the sun at your back. This way you avoid shadows on players’ faces. Overcast
days are sometimes ideal. While the colors aren’t as vibrant, the flatter, more even light means fewer shadows.

9. SOME OF THE BEST SPORTS SHOTS HAPPEN AWAY FROM THE ACTION
Action shots aren’t always the best ones. Candid pics of players during warm-ups or on the sidelines can be captivating, too.

10. YOUR SON/DAUGHTER ISN’T THE ONLY PLAYER ON THE FIELD
Share and share alike. If you’re photographing your child, snap a few of their teammates, too. Your fellow parents/guardians will thank you for it. It’s a team game, after all.

Side note from Lee:

Yes you all have a camera in your cell phone. See what you can do with that if you do not have access to a DSLR. See what we did from a single iPhone picture and imagine the possibility from a DSLR!

From this with a wide field: 

To an action focused shot: 

 

 

We cannot wait to see your results!
Submit to our Facebook or email us: info@sfyouthsoccer.com (subject: Photo Submission)

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